Martin-Storey, A., Prickett, K. et Crosnoe, R. (2018). Disparities in sleep duration and quality related to sexual minority status: Findings from the American Time Use Survey. Sleep, 41(8). DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsy090
Disparities in sleep duration and quality related to sexual minority status: Findings from the American Time Use Survey
2018

Study Objectives: The importance of sleep for health necessitates investigation of disparities in multiple aspects of sleep. Given the potential disruption to sleep posed by the well-documented discrimination experienced by sexual minorities, disparities related to sexual minority status warrant such attention. This study sought to (1) measure differences in same- and different-sex couples in sleep duration and perceived restedness, (2) examine how the link between sleep duration and restedness varied among same- and different-sex couples, and (3) assess variation in restedness across state-level sexual minority indicators.

Methods: Participants in the Wellbeing Module of the American Time Use Survey, assessed in 2010, 2012, and 2013 (n = 17378), completed time diaries assessing sleep duration and evaluated their own restedness.

Results: Multinomial and ordinal regression analyses showed no links between partner sex and sleep among men. Women with same-sex partners reported lower restedness than women with different-sex partners, and perceptions of restedness were more strongly linked to sleep duration for the former than the latter. Finally, women with the same-sex partners living in states more supportive of sexual minorities reported better restedness than those in less supportive states.

Conclusions: Women with same-sex partners were vulnerable to lower restedness, especially when they reported lower sleep duration or were in less supportive environments. Such disparities could underlie related disparities in health, as sleep health is predictive of health outcomes. Future research is needed to explore the role of sleep in explaining variation in health outcomes among sexual minority women.


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